Sunday, October 30, 2016

Book Sale 2016 (part 3)

It has been over a month since the Planned Parenthood book sale ended, and I have yet to post about some of the books I bought. I did do two posts showing books my husband bought and books my son bought while the sale was still going on. We went on the last day of the sale, when they had books for half price, and we all found additonal books to buy.

I had hoped to purchase less books this year, but I did not achieve that goal. In addition to finding several books I have been seeking for years, I also found a treasure trove of vintage paperbacks with lovely covers. That was very unusual for this book sale and I could not resist.

This post features a mix of books -- books I have been looking for, books I bought mainly for the covers, books I was happy to find ...

Gold Comes in Bricks

Last year, J. Kingston Pierce did a post at Killer Covers on vintage paperbacks featuring butterfly chairs. Since that time, I have been wanting a copy of this book by A. A. Fair (Erle Stanley Gardner). The cover illustration is by Robert McGinnis.



Farewell, My Lovely

This novel by Raymond Chandler, published in 1940, is the second in the series featuring private eye Philip Marlowe. I purchased two paperback editions of this book at this year's book sale, but the one I was happiest with has cover art by Tom Adams. That illustrator may be best known for his Agatha Christie paperback covers, but he also created several covers for Raymond Chandler's books.



Deadly Nightshade

I have been looking for this book forever. I had read most of the books in the Henry Gamadge mystery series by Elizabeth Daly and at one time I was only missing three of them, this one plus Murders in Volume 2 and The Book of the Dead. I found all of them but this one and it continued to elude me. This is the second book in the series.



Brothers Keepers

This is a comic novel by Donald E. Westlake. According to what I have read, it does not truly fit in the crime fiction genre, but I am sure it is close enough for me. Brother Benedict has his own page at Clerical Detectives. I read the first two pages and I know I am going to love this book.




Dead Skip

This is the first book in the DKA Files series by Joe Gores. I have been looking for it for years. I had a copy of the fourth book in the series (32 Cadillacs) but did not want to start there.  This year I found this book plus the 2nd and 3rd book in the series. They are all book club editions, but  that is fine. It means that they have nice easily readable print and I can finally read a book by Joe Gores.



Guards! Guards!

This book is the first of a series featuring the City Watch and Samuel Vimes, part of the Discworld series of books by Terry Pratchett. Since I am a newbie to the Discworld books, I will borrow this description from an article on Comic Crime from the Whodunit? Mystery Bookstore in Canada. (The article also has comments about other authors of comic crime, including Donald Westlake, Charlotte MacLeod and Norbert Davis.)
Pratchett has created his own universe – the Discworld – in which the medieval jostles with the modern, magic rules, and strange creatures abound. One of his several series – there are nearly fifty novels in all – focuses on the police force – the “Guard” – of the Discworld’s major city, Ankh Morpork. Like most in the modern real world, this city is growing rapidly, as immigrants come to it looking for work. In the Discworld’s case, the newcomers include other species: wizards, witches, elves, dwarves, werewolves, goblins, golums, and others.  The man in charge of policing this lot is Samuel Vimes, arguably the most completely realized cop in the Raymond Chandler mode since Philip Marlowe himself.




Twentieth Century Crime and Mystery Writers (Macmillan, 1980)

This definitely falls in the category of serendipitous find. I have looked for this mystery reference book edited by John M. Reilly off and on for years, but whenever I found it online I never was sure what I would be getting or if it was worth the price.  Then at the book sale, there it was in a stack labeled Anthologies. It has 1568 pages providing "detailed information on more than 600 English Language writers of mystery fiction" plus two appendices on 19th century English writers and on foreign language authors. For three dollars.






20 comments:

  1. The one that interests me most is the Elizabeth Daly book, Tracy. I have a Gamadage book around here somewhere - I remember that I liked it well enough when I read it. But for whatever reason I never read another. Now your post has rekindled my interest.

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    1. It has been a while since I have read any of the Gamadge boos, Yvette. I do hope I still like these books when I read them again. Reviews I have read recently have been variable. And some have said the later books in the series are better.

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  2. The Reilly book is extremely useful. I use it almost every day. However, I note a couple of points:
    1. After they have listed the mystery fiction of an author, they go on to list virtually everything else he ever wrote. So, in the case of someone like G.K. Chesterton, the bibliography can go on for many useless pages.
    2. The book is riddled with errors. Sometimes books get omitted or it is mistakenly noted whether or not a book is in a series.

    So the book can only be used with caution. Like you, I have the 1980 version (I bought it for $10, so you beat me). It is my understanding that there are a few later editions, so they might have improved their accuracy.

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    1. That is interesting about the long list of all the books written by author... Not surprising about the errors in such a long book, but I will be on the alert. I did see online that there is a 1985 2nd ed. If I ever see it at a good price I will grab it. Thanks for the comments.

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  3. I'm jealous! You got some great books. I love the cover on Farewell My Lovely.

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    1. That is a gorgeous cover, Joan, and I was very happy to find it. Now I am eager to find more of them. Even though I purchased too many books, I am very happy with all the purchases.

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  4. Oh, Tracy, you got some great books!! I am happy for you. And I can see how you'd fall for those covers. They're amazing. The Westlake and Daly look especially good...

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    1. I was thrilled with the Westlake book, Margot, because I don't have many books by him and that one looks very good. I am going to have to seek more of his books out.

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  5. Very interesting. I love the old covers but I think I would find the last book most interesting - what a find.

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    1. It is very interesting, Katrina. Perfect for me because I like reading books in earlier decades.

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  6. Beautiful covers! Envious of that last book, that was a real find!

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    1. It is a great book, Peggy, but very heavy to sit and read. I do love mystery reference books though.

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  7. Nice haul, especially the Gores and Westlake. I wonder if you'll get to Joe before me? Probably....

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    1. I do hope to get to Dead Skip in early 2017, Col. And read the Westlake soon too.

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  8. 57% into Mort by Pratchett... book is funny but when 'Death' is out of the scenes...the percentage of 'funniness' decreases. I'm still hooked on Terry and will definitely read Guards, Guards!

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    1. I am now about 20% into Mort, and loving it, Nancy. I am very glad I finally read something by Pratchett and am looking forward to more of his books.

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  9. I looked at the pictures before reading the words, and had already deduced that you MUST be talking about fabulous covers! What a treasure trove...

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    1. They are lovely covers, Moira. I bought way too many books, as usual. Oh well.

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  10. Tracy, I have read a few A.A. Fair novels in my youth but not as many as those by Erle Stanley Gardner. I also need to read Raymond Chandler, especially his short stories.

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    1. I read a few A.A. Fair novels when I was younger too, Prashant, but I have forgotten them all, so I can safely reread them and enjoy them. I need to read more Raymond Chandler also Prashant, and luckily the one in this post is the next one I want to read. I have hear many good things about that book.

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