Saturday, December 10, 2016

The 2017 Sci-Fi Experience

For the fifth year I am joining in on the Sci-Fi Experience, hosted by Carl at Stainless Steel Droppings. The 2017 Sci-Fi Experience began on December 1st and runs through January 31st, 2017.

Per Carl...
The Sci-Fi Experience will hopefully give people an opportunity to: 
     a) Continue their love affair with science fiction
     b) Return to science fiction after an absence, or
     c) Experience for the first time just how exhilarating science fiction can be. 
If you have ever wanted to give science fiction a try, or are already a fan of the genre and are looking for a group of kindred spirits, this is the event for you.

This is not a challenge. There is no number of books to aim for. You can read any type of literature related to science fiction or even nonfiction material about space travel and enjoy any other media related to these topics. There is a site where reviews are shared, if you should desire to write one.

December isn't a great month for science fiction reading for me, or for starting up any new endeavor relating to reading, but I do plan to try to fit in some science fiction reading this month, and will continue with a few in January.

I plan to read one graphic novel, Descender, Vol. 1: Tin Stars. Also The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick. I also hope to read a book by John Scalzi (TBD), World of Ptavv by Larry Niven, and The Brief History of the Dead by Kevin Brockmeier.





19 comments:

  1. Have fun with this! I've done it quite a few times and always enjoyed it, but know I can't commit to it this year, or into January, for one reason or another.

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    1. Thanks, Cath. This event always reminds me to read some of the science fiction books that I have, and that is a good thing.

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  2. I hope you'll really enjoy this year's experience, Tracy. One of these years, I need to expand my sci-fi reading beyond what I've done thus far. You've chosen some interesting-sounding titles.

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    1. Margot, I have found that I enjoy science fiction because the stories often have a mystery behind them, just not necessarily a crime.

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  3. Good for you! That's an ambitious reading list. Hope you enjoy them all. If you want a Scalzi with a mystery element, Lock-In would be a good choice. If you want more SF-y, the first of the Old Man's War novels is great.

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    1. You are right, Richard, it is an ambitions list and it takes me so long to get around to reviewing the books. I have read both Lock-In and Old Man's War and loved both of them, especially Lock-In. I will probably read The Last Colony, the 3rd book in the Old Man's War series, but I also have Fuzzy Nation.

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  4. I can recommend Kim Stanley Robinson highly; I suggest Antarctica or Aurora as good places to begin. Robinson's works are often huge books or go through multiple volumes, but they are so worth your time.

    Another excellent author is Neal Stephenson. Here, I would say start with SevenEves or Cryptonomicon. Stephenson is another writer of really big stories, but one of today's very best.

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    1. Thanks for those recommendations, Howard. I have heard of Robinson, but don't know much about his work. Antarctica sounds especially interesting, but you are right... it is very long.

      I have been interested in Cryptonomicon by Stephenson. Sounds very good, but I have been worried about the length. I do hope to try it some day.

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  5. I used to read a lot of science fiction. These days I'm incredibly reluctant to read any sci-fi written later than the 1940s. There is so much great 19th century and early 20th century sci-fi and I find it appeals to me more than the modern stuff.

    Although I must admit I did read Larry Niven's RINGWORLD (written around 1970 I think?) not long ago. Great book.

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    1. I haven't read much science fiction from the 1940s or earlier, dfordoom. I did read Red Planet by Heinlein, but other earlier science fiction books I can remember reading are probably from the 1950s or 60s. I will have to check some others out. Any suggestions for specific titles would be welcome.

      I will look into RINGWORLD also.

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  6. I have been trying to read the story ARRIVAL was based on by Ted Chiang and I know now, once and for all, this genre is not for me. I could read a book about time travel that did not rely on physics or astronomy or any type of hard science. But once I see numbers on the page, I just lose interest. It's characters that interest me. I am sure it's a loss to me.

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    1. I could read a book about time travel that did not rely on physics or astronomy or any type of hard science.

      Try Jack Finney's TIME AND AGAIN. It's an old title (1970) but it's a fine time travel story and you don't need to be a physicist to read it

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    2. I agree with dfordoom's suggestion of TIME AND AGAIN, Patti. I can't remember if I have read any other time travel books, although my husband has a huge book of time travel short stories I want to read. I mainly like time travel if they don't try to explain it too much.

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    3. Another voice in favour of Time and Again. I'm not a SciFi reader, but I did love that book.

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    4. Time and Again is one of Glen's favorites, Moira, and he has read several of Finney's other books. And still has his copies of them. I should try more of them.

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  7. Now there's a genre I have neglected. Good luck with the sf challenge, Tracy.

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    1. Thanks, Prashant, I hope I do get all of these read.

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  8. Can't do it this year I'm afraid - sounds great, as ever though!

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    1. I actually have thought of a couple more I would like to add, Sergio, so I will probably expand my sci fi reading into February.

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