Monday, January 23, 2017

2017 War Through the Generations Reading Challenge: World War II


In the first year I was blogging, I joined in on a challenge hosted by War Through the Generations to read books about World War I, non-fiction and fiction.  This year they have initiated a WWII Reading Challenge for 2017, which runs from January 1, 2017, through December 31, 2017.



As described at the site:
This is a no-stress reading challenge. Feel free to set your own goal. Read fiction, nonfiction, poetry, children’s books, etc. Whatever strikes your fancy. These can be the years leading up to the war, during the war, or in the few years after the war.
There will be some readalongs throughout the year, described HERE.

I have plenty of novels to choose from, and even some non-fiction which I usually avoid. But no definite plans for what I will read. I have a couple of books from the Billy Boyle series by James R. Benn and I have almost all of the books by Alan Furst, which cover this time period. Also the series featuring St-Cyr and Kohler by J. Robert Janes is set in France during World War II.

Suggestions are welcome.


17 comments:

  1. This sounds like an interesting challenge, Tracy. I'll be looking forward to following along as you read books for it.

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    1. I am glad they decided to do a challenge this year, Margot. I love books about World War II.

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  2. Thanks, I think I'll be joining in.

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    1. I hope you do, Katrina. I will be interested in seeing what you will read for the challenge.

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  3. I recommend The Tin Flute (Bonheur d'occasion) by Gabrielle Roy, which takes place in war-time Montreal. A Canadian classic, I wouldn't be surprised if you'd already read it. What I do not recommend is Montrealer Lionel Shapiro's big bestseller The Sixth of June!

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    1. I have not read it, Brian, but I did a little research and it does sound perfect. Thanks so much the suggestion. I will be getting a copy.

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  4. Oh I think you will enjoy this Tracy, because it's an area of interest to you already isn't it? And plenty of choices out there.

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    1. Yes, Moira, I would naturally read some books about World War II and the surrounding years anyway, but I am hoping this motivates me to read some nonfiction books I have, plus some books that I have been putting off for a while.

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  5. Hi Tracy,
    I'd love to read All the Lights We Cannot See (I think that's the title) in March. I have others as well. I'm a little confused how to sign up for the challenge, though. I went to the site but did not see a sign-up.

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    1. Judith, someone asked that same question in the comments. The response was to sign up in the comments, which reminds me that I have not added the link for my signup to the comments. Then they will add that you are commenting in one of the comments. It is different but this is an informal challenge, I guess. The linky is for reviews.

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  6. This is a terrific challenge, Tracy. I'd recommend Jack Higgins' THE EAGLE HAS LANDED, a few by Alistair MacLean, and Herman Wouk.

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    1. THE EAGLE HAS LANDED is on my list to read for the challenge, Prashant, and I am hoping that one of the Alistair MacLean books that I have would fit the challenge too. Very good suggestions.

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    2. Thanks, Tracy. Both of these bestselling authors would fit into your challenge. Ken Follett's EYE OF THE NEEDLE is another fine war novel.

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    3. My husband also suggested EYE OF THE NEEDLE, Prashant, but I did not think I had a copy ... and now I found one on my shelves. I hope to include it. I also have JACKDAWS, written much more recently. Have you read that one?

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    4. Tracy, I haven't read that one. I rarely ever read or re-read popular bestselling fiction from the 60s through 80s, like I used to, though I continue to read Jack Higgins and not long ago read a Harold Robbins and Lawrence Sanders. I have been planning to go back to Alistair MacLean, Frederick Forsyth, Dick Francis, Len Deighton, and Wilbur Smith. But god knows when!

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    5. I've only seen the movie version of THE EAGLE HAS LANDED (which is superb). I should give the book a try. Are any of his other books worth trying as well?

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    6. Same for me, Dfordoom. I have seen the movie, now I want to read the book and rewatch the movie. As far as his other books, I cannot speak from experience but Prashant has recommended Higgins' books to me, and I will be trying others.

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