Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Some Favorite Authors from the Book Sale

Between September 20 - 28th of this year, we attended the Planned Parenthood book sale four times. I always get too many books, and you would think I would slow down. Not this year. Again I bought an insane amount of books, but I am happy with all that I bought.

Today I am featuring some books by forgotten authors that I found at the book sale.

I have become enamored with Anthony Price's David Audley espionage series and have had difficulties finding decent copies at a reasonable price. On the very last day of the sale I found five paperbacks by Anthony Price. What a treasure trove!

The  books in the series (19 in all) were written during the Cold War and are about an intelligence organization functioning at that time. A New Kind of War (1987) takes the reader back to a younger David Audley in Greece in 1945.

The other four books in this series that I bought are:
October Men (1973)
Our Man in Camelot (1975)
Sion Crossing (1984)
Here Be Monsters (1985)




Blood and Judgment (1959) by Michael Gilbert is the first novel featuring Patrick Petrella. He was also in a good number of short stories and one other novel. I have been looking for this novel for a while, so it was another wonderful find.

I have only read 4 novels by Michael Gilbert, but I liked them all. Plus one book of short stories about Calder and Behrens, British counter-intelligence agents (Game Without Rules). So I am thinking I will like the Patrick Petrella series also.

Other books by Michael Gilbert that I found:
Be Shot for Sixpence (1956)
After the Fine Weather (1963)
Flashpoint (1974)
The Killing of Katie Steelstock (1980)

And a short story collection:
Mr. Calder and Mr. Behrens (1982)







Hugh Pentecost was a pseudonym used by Judson Philips. Philips wrote many, many mystery novels, including standalone books and series about John Jericho, Uncle George Crowder, Luke Bradley, Pierre Chambrun, Julian Quist, Grant Simon, Dr. John Smith, and Peter Styles. But it is only his Pierre Chambrun series that I have read. Twenty two books were published between 1962 and 1988, although I am sure I did not read all of them. Chambrun is a hotel manager and I think it was that setting that was so fascinating when I read them years ago.

This year at the book sale I found Death after Breakfast (1978), Murder in High Places (1983), and Nightmare Time (1986) by Pentecost.


Another favorite author is Victor Canning, I discovered his books, especially the Birdcage series, at Existential Ennui. (Nick Jones also introduced me to Anthony Powell's series.) I found this lovely paperback copy of The Mask of Memory (1974), which is the next book in the series that I have been waiting to read.



17 comments:

  1. Michael Gilbert is an excellent author, I really liked his Death in Captivity. I didn't realise (partly because I haven't looked him up) that there were a lot more to choose from. I have two on my tbr pile though, Death has Deep Roots and Smallbone Deceased, both sound good. You got a great haul!

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    1. I liked Death in Captivity also, Cath. Very interesting story. I have also read Smallbone Deceased but did not like it as much as some people do, but in general I like everything I have read by him, just a matter of degree. I haven't read Death has Deep Roots yet but someday I will get to it.

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  2. My favorite of all of those mentioned is Mr. Calder and Mr. Behrens, but any of the Gilberts should be good.

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    1. I love the Calder and Behrens stories, Rick, and look forward to reading more stories in Mr. Calder and Mr. Behrens. And the other Gilbert books also.

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  3. Oh, I'd forgotten how prolific Hugh Pentecost was, Tracy! And I did like his Pierre Chambrun novels. I'm so glad you found some of those less-well-known authors, and I hope you'll enjoy their work.

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    1. I know, Margot, I was amazed how many books Pentecost had written. One thing I read said close to 100 novels, it actually looked like more to me, and I gave up trying to count. I would like to try some of the police procedurals too someday, but the only other series I have books from now is the Julian Quist series.

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  4. I am very impressed with the titles and authors that people had read and then donated. These are not run of the mill book sale offerings, I think. I haven't even heard of most of the authors, only Michael Gilbert. I've liked the few books I've read by him.

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    1. I am amazed by the variety of authors that are available, Nan, but it is hit or miss on what is available, except for the best-selling authors of course. Two of the series in this post are espionage stories, which I love, but often are not so available. And probably less popular at the sale also. I have liked books by Michael Gilbert also, I like his writing style.

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  5. Yikes, Tracy, I have not read any of these! But I now have a good list of books to consider. I see you have also reviewed Breakfast at Tiffany's, which I did read loooong ago, even before the movie came out.

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    1. The hard thing about the book sale, Mathew, is that I come home wanting to read all the authors I just added to my stacks, plus the ones I had before. All of them are so tempting. I have just finished Death After Breakfast a couple of days ago, and enjoyed it.

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    2. That's the way my Kindle library's getting to look, Tracy. Good think I don't buy paper books anymore or I'd be living like a tunnel rat.

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    3. I have way too many books on my Kindle too, Mathew, and I usually avoid reading them. But I plan to read more ebooks next year.

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  6. I am a big Anthony Price fan. I used to give the copies I found to other people but now I keep them for myself!

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    1. I intend to hold on to my copies, CLM. I am sure I will reread them someday, after I have read the whole series.

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  7. You did well with the Price and Canning's - both of whom I have yet to read. I'm losing count of the number of years they've sat neglected.

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    1. I can definitely say those two authors are worth trying, Col, but you have plenty of years left to do that.

      You had birthday recently, didn't you. Happy birthday, belatedly.

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